Senior Exhibition II

April 11 — May 4, 2014

DAYS AND HOURS
Tuesdays through Sundays 1 - 4 p.m.
Closed Mondays and April 17 - 20 for Easter Break
Free and Open to the public

 

Tyler Friend

A graduate of Franklin Classical School, Tenn., Friend has a wide variety of work experiences including serving as an IT intern at CME Engineering, instructor at First Light Arts Academy, host at Mexicali Grill, student assistant at the Latimer Family Library, global news writer for the Review student newspaper and graphic design for Prodigium, LLC. He has been published in Saint Vincent’s Generation magazine and has exhibited at Firstlight Arts Academy in Franklin, Tenn., and Art All Night in Pittsburgh.

“I’m a serotinal, middle of the night, cool blacktop walk artist,” Friend commented on his artistic approach. “I’m a disemboweled dictionary artist. I’m a sloth in the aviary artist. I enjoy working with different mediums, both traditional and digital, and mixing them in experimental ways. I have a passion for color and like to explore the realm of texture. I’m also very preoccupied with the balance of order and chaos, and most of my pieces try to incorporate both precision and freedom. I also have a preoccupation with the relationship between the natural, spiritual and human worlds. Similarly, my works often combine elements of portraiture, landscape and abstraction. They often touch on themes of identity, gender, sexuality, community and isolation. I believe that the truest artworks are at least semi-autobiographical. I also draw heavily from literary works, especially A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”

Matthew Miller

A member of the freshman orientation committee, Miller has also served as a student assistant at The Saint Vincent Gallery. He has studied abroad in Italy for a semester at Florence University of the Arts, and has done language studies at Cuernavaca Language School in Mexico. His work experience includes tech crew and set construction for Saint Vincent Summer Theatre, an internship with John Ritter Illustrations and work as a lifeguard and swim instructor at the East Suburban Family YMCA.

“In my art, I deconstruct myths, fairy tales, Greek and Roman images, and religious icons to present them in a contemporary style,” Miller commented about his art. “Oftentimes, the image is used to display a moment of heightened emotion. I primarily use -- but am not limited to -- oil paint. The methodology behind my art is consistent. Although there might be similarities between different projects, my art is linked by recurring forms and thematic elements.”

Amanda Schrott

Schrott has been active at Saint Vincent in the Art Club which she served as president, Sports Friendship Day and the Empty Bowl Project. She also has experience as a catalogue specialist for the McCarl Gallery, as a sculpting intern for Earthview Studios and in art studio maintenance for the Saint Vincent Visual Arts Department.

“Art explains what words cannot,” Schrott commented about her art. “Sometimes emotions, ideas and thoughts can be so overwhelming that words cannot express the feeling in a way that is satisfying to me, so I turn those things into images. My inspiration comes from my childhood history and social issues in today’s society. These social issues affect all of us, many times in ways we do not understand. The lack of understanding is where I draw my motivation to create. My artwork has a lot of symbolism in the content and the composition. I like to place items within the piece that hint at what I am trying to explain without words. I create my best work after I have read or learned about the issue at hand. Whenever I learn about a new or old issue, I feel the need to express that issue using images. My artwork means the world to me. I want to educate the masses and learn more about myself while doing so. Art has taught me who I am as a person and what I believe in. Now I want to show others who I am using images.”

Michael Waver

Waver is a graduate of Webster Thomas High School, N.Y. He has done freelance assignments including designing the band logos and t-shirts for two local bands and designing and painting an artistic piece on a bass guitar. His work experience also includes culinary production for the Aramark Corporation and gallery attendant for The Saint Vincent Gallery where he greeted visitors.

“I make art because I see the world as it is, and as it could be, as things and people that exist and that which does not,” Waver commented about his artistic philosophy. “In the artistic world, things can’t be created that cannot exist in the reality we are accustomed. Yet, my creations are made for the real world; It’s like connecting reality to unreality. These two separate worlds meet, and make one creation. The art, and the response it receives, are like cause and effect. I find inspiration in everything naturally beautiful, from the stars of the sky, to the curve of a smile, to the light radiating from the sun in the evening to the natural curls of a winding vine. Although my own art does not often physically represent that which inspires me, it is purposeful; See, I see not a reason to create that which inspires me, if it already exists. I use their given inspiration as a springboard; to propel myself into a creative state in a world where imagination is the only guide. Oftentimes, I mean to create art that is something unique; that comes across as real enough to believe its reality, but retaining aspects of unreality. I love the nature of science fiction and medieval works, so the majority of my work ends up drawing upon either of the given categories. I try to evoke something moving yet powerful through my use of colors and high contrasts, often ending up in my art having a darker style. I don’t think my work is perfect, not terrible, like all other things of this world. But I think it to be different, and I work hard to make it that way. Does it affect you? That is not for me to decide.”

  

 

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Deriving Beauty

Archabbot Aurelius Stehle, O.S.B., and Liturgical Splendor 

April 3 — May 7, 2014

DAYS AND HOURS
Tuesdays through Sundays 1 - 4 p.m.
Closed Mondays
Free and Open to the public

 

 

 

urelius Stehle was born in Pittsburgh in 1877, and as a child moved with his family to Greensburg, Pennsylvania. There he attended the parochial school attached to the Benedictine church of the Most Blessed Sacrament and at the age of thirteen entered the scholasticate at Saint Vincent. Completing his studies at the college and seminary in 1899, Aurelius Stehle was ordained to the priesthood by Bishop Richard Phelan of Pittsburgh and for the next nineteen years served at the archabbey in various capacities, first as professor in the classical (college) course, and then, after 1911, as prefect and professor of Latin and Greek in the seminary. He was an accomplished Latinist and for twenty-five years (since his novitiate) had also been master of ceremonies in the monastery, in which capacity he had overseen the monastic celebrations of the liturgy. Aurelius was instrumental in the implementation of Saint Pope Pius X’s 1903 motu proprio, Tra le Sollecitudini, on church music that restored Gregorian chant to the monastic liturgy. Throughout this time, Aurelius gained a reputation both at Saint Vincent and among churchmen throughout the United States as an expert on liturgy and was often sought out by diocesan liturgists around the country for advice on liturgical matters. In 1915 Aurelius published his Manual for Episcopal Ceremonies. While other such manuals were in circulation, this manual was lauded for its clarity and ability to be used and understood by sacristans, masters of ceremonies, seminarians, priests, and bishops. Bishop Canevin of Pittsburgh noted, “[Aurelius] has...not sacrificed clearness for the sake of brevity, nor has he spared labor in his endeavors to find the most reliable interpretations of obscure and doubtful points.”

The election of Aurelius in 1918 as Coadjutor Archabbot marked the beginning of a new era in the history of Saint Vincent. He was the first archabbot of the community not to have been educated by Boniface Wimmer and the first to have been born in the United States. He was also at forty-one, the youngest. Aurelius assumed his position as leader of the community at a time when the First World War was coming to an end and when Saint Vincent, like the rest of America, was ready to embark on a dynamic and outward-looking engagement with the world at large. Just as the United States emerged from the war with a clearer awareness of its global responsibilities and its new international role, so too Saint Vincent under Archabbot Aurelius, entered the 1920s with a deeper understanding of the challenges and obligations to liturgy and its missionary heritage.

This display at the Saint Vincent Gallery brings together Aurelius’ Manual of Episcopal Ceremonies, letters of correspondence, and liturgical items worn and used by him that highlight the beauty and splendor of the liturgy, as well as his role in the proper celebration of liturgical rites.


 

 

This was Featured on the New Liturgical Movement. Click for Story.

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 Crowns and Palm Branches

Sacred Relics of Saint Vincent Archabbey

On View 

DAYS AND HOURS
Tuesdays through Sundays 1 - 4 p.m.
Closed Mondays
Free and Open to the public

 

 

anctæ reliquiæ. Holy Relics. Comprised of over 1,000 relics, Saint Vincent's relic collection encourages veneration and reverence of the saints. Many of the relics have been collected or authenticated by the founder of Saint Vincent, Archabbot Boniface Wimmer, O.S.B., (1809-1887). Saint Vincent is very blessed to possess a leg relic from a martyr of Otranto, canonized by Pope Francis this summer (The Otranto relic can be seen in the middle photo, above, during veneration on the day of their canonization). Many other relics were sealed and authenticated by Archabbot Denis Strittmatter, O.S.B., sixth Archabbot of Saint Vincent, who was also authorized to re-seal and re-document relics with broken seals or lost documentation.

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In the Roman Catholic tradition, a relic is a piece of the body of a saint or holy person, an object or piece of an object owned or used by a saint or holy person, or some other important religious artifact that is maintained for veneration. In Christianity, the first scriptural mention of relics comes from Acts 19:11–12, and concerns Saint Paul’s handkerchiefs, which were said to be imbued with the healing power of God. They were sent to various Christian communities and many accounts of healings were reported. In the early church the graves, tombs and relics of martyrs and holy men and women were venerated. The Martyrdom of St. Polycarp, written, between 150 and 160 A.D., records that St. Polycarp’s relics were objects of veneration by the faithful.

In Rome, early Christians frequently went out to the catacombs on Sundays, spending the day worshiping, praying, eating and recreating near the tombs of holy men and women and family members. When Christianity was legalized in 313 A.D., Christians began building churches, many of which were built over the tombs of martyrs. A perfect example of this is the old Saint Peter’s Basilica in Rome built between 326 and 363 A.D. over the tomb of Saint Peter the Apostle. As the Church grew, demand for the bodies of the saints (martyrs and holy men and women) also grew. By the early Middle Ages it was already a long-established practice to include the body of a saint or a significant relic of a saint in the altar on which mass was celebrated. In 787 A.D. the Second Council of Nicaea decreed that every altar should contain a relic.

A complimentary booklet accompanies this display


This was Featured on the New Liturgical Movement. Click for Story.

 

  

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Boniface Wimmer, O.S.B.
Visions of a Founder

On View 

DAYS AND HOURS
Tuesdays through Sundays 1 - 4 p.m.
Closed Mondays
Free and Open to the public



he greatest Catholic missionary of nineteenth-century America," is how the late dean of American Catholic Historians, John Tracy Ellis, described Boniface Wimmer, the founder of Saint Vincent and Benedictine Monasticism in North America. Coming from the Bavarian Abbey of Metten, Wimmer came to America in 1846 to establish the Order of Saint Benedict in the New World, to evangelize the immigrants, and to preserve and strengthen their Catholic faith and identity by providing them with pastoral care and formal education.

Numbers never tell the full story, but it is interesting to note that by 1880, only 34 years after Wimmer and his eighteen companions arrived in Pennsylvania, nearly 900 Benedictine monks and nuns were working and praying in 60 monasteries in the United States. These monastics served 138 parishes where they provided pastoral care for 44,000 souls, operated three major seminaries, six colleges, and 63 elementary schools, and educated an estimated 7,000 students. 

By 1880, Benedictine monks and nuns served in 21 American dioceses and vicariates apostolic (out of a total of 70), located in 20 states and territories of the Union. Most of the Benedictine monks and nuns who carried out this work of pastoral care, evangelization, and education in nineteenth-century America regarded Boniface Wimmer as their founder and their inspiration.

Today, American Benedictines who trace their roots back to Wimmer serve in more than 20 American states, as well as in Canada, Mexico, Puerto Rico, the Bahamas, Colombia, Brazil, Taiwan, and Japan.

To honor the 125th Anniversary of Boniface Wimmer's death (December 2012), the Gallery inaugurated a permanent exhibit made up of personal artifacts from Wimmer's life to honor his legacy and enduring contributions to the Church and monasticism.

A complimentary booklet accompanies this display

This Exhibit was Featured on the New Liturgical Movement. Click for Story.

  

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