Senior Exhibition I

March 12 — 29, 2015

Opening Reception
Thursday, March 12, 6 to 8 p.m.

 

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Join us as we welcome the first group of graduating art majors for Senior Exhibition I.
Senior Exhibition II: April 11— May 4, 2015

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Sara Krug

Krug was born in St. Marys and is the daughter of Steven and Helen Krug. She expects to graduate in May with a bachelor of arts degree in both graphic design and communication. While on campus, she has dedicated her time and talents as a work-study for Campus Ministry, as a layout and design intern for the marketing and communications department and as the the art director for the monthly School of Social Sciences, Communication and Education e-newsletter. She has also served as the secretary and vice president of the Respect Life Club and worked as the marketing and design coordinator for the first ever Mr. SVC pageant, which raised money for the Banana Project in Guatemala. Krug teaches music for Children’s Faith Formation at the Saint Vincent Basilica Parish and has also helped with several different retreats and programs over her four years at Saint Vincent. She is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta honor society, Alpha Chi honor society, Lambda Pi Eta honor society and Who’s Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities and has been named to the dean’s list every semester. Krug is also a recipient of the Saint Vincent College Community Service Award. She traveled on a spring break service trip to Brazil with Campus Ministry last year and will be traveling with a group to Haiti this March with the Office of Service Learning. Krug enjoys being involved and serving the Saint Vincent community because she describes it as her “home away from home.”

“Art is equivalent to an Energizer bunny living inside of me,” Krug commented. “It is the fuel that keeps me moving forward. It is my freedom. It is my drive. It is my passion. It is my past, my present and my future. It is my addiction. It is my happy place. Art is my home. Ever since I was a little girl, I loved art class so much that I could not wait to take a project home and show it to my parents. I was so proud of what my hands had created. Then, in high school, art became my refuge. I claimed my independence and found a place with few limits and barriers, just a blank canvas with endless opportunities for me to create. In college, art became my career and my identity. Now, my heart continues to be penetrated with a love for art that is expressed through endless bursts of creativity. I am so blessed with every talent that God had gifted me with. My faith gives me the drive to embrace every opportunity for originality. I am never quite able to understand where my ideas come from, but they are like a jolt of lighting that comes out of nowhere. I am powered by my own imagination. I love creating 3-D sculptures out of repurposed materials and turning typical objects into something completely new and exciting. Every medium of art is an opportunity for me to explore and try something that has not been done before, at least with my perspective and purpose. I am very expressive and passionate about my work. I love finding inspiration in the smallest places, which includes marveling over my enormous collection of colorful and detailed buttons. I am drawn to abstract and conceptual elements of art and design and enjoy stepping outside of the box. Instead of recreating what I see, I strive to take art to a new level and bring my own ideas to life.”

 

Maria Lang

Lang was raised in DuBois in a Catholic, homeschooling family. Her parents raised her and her siblings to love and embrace their faith and they encouraged her to follow her dream to become an artist. This background has shaped her college experience and she came to Saint Vincent College to major in studio art and theology. While there, Lang has been active in campus ministry. She plays keyboard for the music team at their Festivals of Praise, she has helped to lead small groups, and she enjoys taking part in Bible studies. Lang sings in the Saint Vincent Camerata. She has enjoyed taking part in Art Club and Respect Life Club and being a work study for campus ministry and the art department. She is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta honor society, Who’s Who among Students in American Colleges and Universities, Theta Alpha Kappa honor society, and the dean’s list. She has also started an online art education business called Art Talk’n.

“Ever since I was able to hold a marker, I have been drawing,” Lang commented. “My art has always been about the things of which I dream; it embodies my passions. It is about bringing to life the things which one does not experience tangibly in everyday life. I strive to live my life for God and to glorify Him with all my actions. I yearn to show His light, love, and joy to those whom I encounter, but I realize that the best way to bring Him into the lives of others is not by preaching to them but by showing them His beauty in some small way. I see art as my own unique way to bring people to Him. I seek to create art which places the viewer in an intimate moment with God, to help them to place themselves in a scene in which He is present in a special way. My art does not always deal with images that are overtly Christian. Much of my work is inspired by beauty that I see in the world and in people, beauty that comes from God. The art which I make that is clearly about Christ or other Christian figures is meant to bring out His love, joy, and humanity in order to make Him relatable to the people who enter into the image. I dream of helping people fall in love with Him, and through my passions, become passionate for God.”


Katy Muffley

Muffley is majoring in graphic design and communications, concentrating in advertising and public relations. While attending SVC, she also worked in the food service industry for several years as a food server and bartender. In addition, Muffley also completed an internship this past summer as a consultant for the Kiski School in Saltsburg. Working specifically in the communication department, she helped complete projects such as the promotion of campus beautification, writing for the annual Alumni Bulletin and archiving press releases and articles. Upon graduation she hopes to continue working in a similar field. This coming exhibit at the Saint Vincent Gallery will be Muffley’s first art show.

“For most of my life the art I create has been inspired by the natural world around me,” Muffley commented. “Finding a vista to paint on a canvas, or a small piece of nature to photograph has been much of my artistic focus. As every artist, I am always finding new inspiration, and trying to find the beauty in things that would maybe otherwise go unnoticed. While most of my work has been inspired by the natural world around me, recently I’ve been working on finding the beauty in an urban setting. In my professional career I hope to create useful graphics, layouts and templates that others may use, copy or at least be inspired by. However, for me, art is something that I’ve just always loved to do and creating works for friends and family has always been a top priority for me. Though I’m not sure where my path in life will take me, working on my art and improving upon what I’ve already learned is something I hope to continue.”

 

Ivy Schoonover

An active member of the Saint Vincent community, Schoonover has been featured in the college’s Generation Magazine as well as on the cover of Saint Vincent magazine. She is involved with the Spanish Club and works as a student assistant for the Athletic Training Department. She traveled on a mission trip to Guatemala and hopes to continue traveling after graduating in May with a bachelor of arts degree in graphic design. She is from Waynesboro and is the daughter of Laura and Stephen Schoonover.

“My art is an extension of myself, a way for me to express my feelings and share my thoughts in a manner that makes more sense than words,” Schoolover commented about her art. “Through conceptual and abstract works, I create unconventional bridges and interrelate time and space. I enjoy working with a variety of mediums and techniques, including acrylic and oil paints, computer graphics and fiber arts.”


 

Hours
Tuesdays through Sundays, 1 to 4 p.m.
Closed Mondays
Free and open to the public

Other times by appointment
724-805-2107

 

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Brightening the Atmosphere:
Artwork Collected by Carol Pollock

February 12 — March 12, 2015

 

 

 

 o celebrate Carol Pollock’s enduring contributions to the art collection at Saint Vincent College, the Saint Vincent Gallery is pleased to present this special exhibit. 

An artist herself, Carol Pollock served as special programs coordinator and art gallery director at Saint Vincent from 1977 until her retirement in 1997. Her vision was simply to create a "campus-wide” art gallery that made the collection accessible to everyone. “I've attempted to brighten the atmosphere,” was her modest mantra.

This exhibit displays a sampling of pieces created by Pollock, plus several contemporary artworks she added to the Saint Vincent collection during her tenure at the Gallery. A self-guided walking tour of campus will direct visitors to the artworks on view.

As an artist, Pollock sought to enrich the cultural life of both the campus and surrounding community. She expanded the art collection by adding works in all media, including paintings, weaving, sculpture and antique furnishings. Organized activities, like a September plant and handmade pottery sale, helped fund the purchase of new art for the collection.

The Gallery was located in the former rifle range in the basement of Kennedy Hall, now known as the Carey Center and hosted four exhibitions a year. Her diverse, imaginative exhibitions ranged from objects from the set of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood to a collection of photographs from film taken by the Voyager space probe as it flew past the planet Saturn.

In addition to her Gallery work, Pollock was integral in helping to define the Saint Vincent art degree programs during their infancy. She was awarded the Saint Vincent College Presidential Medal of Honor in 1998.

A Complimentary exhibit booklet accompanies this exhibition.

 

Hours
Tuesdays through Sundays, 1 to 4 p.m.
Closed Mondays
Free and open to the public

Other times by appointment
724-805-2107


 

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5th Nationwide Juried Catholic Arts Exhibition

Janet McKenzie, Juror

CLOSED 

 

A complimentary catalogue accompanies this exhibition.
 

  
 
 

eauty, like truth, brings joy to the human heart, and is that precious fruit which resists the erosion of time, which unites generations and enables them to be one in admiration. Blessed Pope Paul VI, Address to Artists. The primary purpose of the competition is to foster the arts of the Western Christian tradition; other artistic traditions of Christian subject matter are also considered. Artworks must be iconographically recognizable and appropriate for liturgical use, churches, chapels, shrines or home altars.

Subjects sought (but not limited to) include: scenes from the life, passion, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ; other biblical scenes, stories and characters; depictions of saints and their lives; current and historical events in the life of the Church; depictions of the seven sacraments; personifications of the corporal works of mercy, virtues and vices, etc. Modernization of the subject is acceptable (e.g. Caravaggio’s The Calling of Saint Matthew, which depicts Christ in biblical clothing but those around Him in the contemporary dress of the artist’s times). Ethnic acculturation is also acceptable; thus, works portraying Christ as an African, Asian or other ethnicity are welcome for jurying. Subjects which will not be considered include: portrayals of noncanonized persons as saints; portraits of clergy or religious; works which are only recognizably religious from their titles; and scenes of the exterior or interior of churches (unless the work is illustrating an important religious/historical event or the administration of the sacraments).

  

The Exhibition was featured in The Washington Post. Click for article.

 

The Exhibition was featured in The Huffington Post. Click for article.

  

The Exhibition was featured in Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Click for article.

 

This competition/exhibition was founded by Br. Nathan Cochran, O.S.B. Click to learn more.

 

 

Janet McKenzie, Juror


Janet McKenzie is an artist internationally-renowned for her distinctive iconography of sacred subjects which glow with an inner, spiritual light. It is appropriate for an artist working in the field of religious art to juror a competition and exhibition fostering religious art, both in its traditional forms and in new expressions. Her works have been chosen for exhibition in the three Nationwide Juried Catholic Arts Competitions she has entered, and she has won prizes twice.

McKenzie is known for sacred imagery that transcends time and place. Her Jesus of the People was selected First Place winner of The National Catholic Reporter’s global competition by juror Sr. Wendy Beckett, the famed art historian and BBC personality. It was revealed for the first time on the Today Show in New York and generated enormous worldwide interest and discussion. The controversial painting challenges stereotypical thinking by including two groups traditionally left out of iconic imagery of Jesus — people of color and women.Janet McKenzie, the 2014 juror, is an artist internationally-renowned for her distinctive iconography of sacred subjects which glow with an inner, spiritual light.

Her art is featured in Holiness and the Feminine Spirit – The Art of Janet McKenzie, which won the 2010 First Place Award for Spirituality from the Catholic Press Association. Another book, The Way of the Cross – The Path to New Life features her Stations of the Cross with reflections by leading religious writer Sr. Joan Chittister, O.S.B.

Her solo exhibitions include: The Haggerty Museum of Art, Milwaukee; Loyola University Museum of Art, Chicago; Carlow University, Pittsburgh; and the Pope John Paul II Cultural Center, Washington, D.C. Her works can be found in the collections of: St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church, Carnegie, Pa.; St. Mary’s University, Winona, Minn.; Daughters of the Heart of Mary, Holyoke, Mass.; and the Archdiocese of Chicago. In 2013, she was the William Belden Noble Lecturer, The Memorial Church, Harvard University.

www.janetmckenzie.com

  

 

The Opening Reception/Prize Award Ceremony
October, 26, 2014

Ann Holmes, Gallery Administrative Director, gave an opening welcome, followed by the 
awarding of the prizes by Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, O.S.B., Chancellor of Saint Vincent College.

1st Prize - The Brother Nathan Cochran Award in Sacred Arts
Neilson Carlin, Temptation in the Wilderness

2nd Prize
Gwyneth Holston, Saint Catherine of Siena

3rd Prize
Bernadette Carstensen, Saint John's Revelation

Honorable Mentions
Zach Brown, Saint Sebastian
Jordan Hainsey, Savior
Pasquale Pristera, Pietà
Christopher Ruane,
Rebuild My Church

 

Congratulations to Christopher Ruane's "The Nativity," People's Choice Winner

 


 

The Exhibition

 

  

 

 

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 Crowns and Palm Branches

Sacred Relics of Saint Vincent Archabbey

On View 


Free and Open to the public

 

 

anctæ reliquiæ. Holy Relics. Comprised of over 1,000 relics, Saint Vincent's relic collection encourages veneration and reverence of the saints. Many of the relics have been collected or authenticated by the founder of Saint Vincent, Archabbot Boniface Wimmer, O.S.B., (1809-1887). Saint Vincent is very blessed to possess a leg relic from a martyr of Otranto, canonized by Pope Francis this summer (The Otranto relic can be seen in the middle photo, above, during veneration on the day of their canonization). Many other relics were sealed and authenticated by Archabbot Denis Strittmatter, O.S.B., sixth Archabbot of Saint Vincent, who was also authorized to re-seal and re-document relics with broken seals or lost documentation.

In the Roman Catholic tradition, a relic is a piece of the body of a saint or holy person, an object or piece of an object owned or used by a saint or holy person, or some other important religious artifact that is maintained for veneration. In Christianity, the first scriptural mention of relics comes from Acts 19:11–12, and concerns Saint Paul’s handkerchiefs, which were said to be imbued with the healing power of God. They were sent to various Christian communities and many accounts of healings were reported. In the early church the graves, tombs and relics of martyrs and holy men and women were venerated. The Martyrdom of St. Polycarp, written, between 150 and 160 A.D., records that St. Polycarp’s relics were objects of veneration by the faithful.

In Rome, early Christians frequently went out to the catacombs on Sundays, spending the day worshiping, praying, eating and recreating near the tombs of holy men and women and family members. When Christianity was legalized in 313 A.D., Christians began building churches, many of which were built over the tombs of martyrs. A perfect example of this is the old Saint Peter’s Basilica in Rome built between 326 and 363 A.D. over the tomb of Saint Peter the Apostle. As the Church grew, demand for the bodies of the saints (martyrs and holy men and women) also grew. By the early Middle Ages it was already a long-established practice to include the body of a saint or a significant relic of a saint in the altar on which mass was celebrated. In 787 A.D. the Second Council of Nicaea decreed that every altar should contain a relic.

A complimentary booklet accompanies this display.


This Exhibit was Featured on the New Liturgical Movement. Click for Story.

 

Gallery Hours

Tuesdays through Sundays, 1 to 4 p.m.
Closed Mondays
Free and open to the public

 

  

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Boniface Wimmer, O.S.B.
Visions of a Founder

On View 


Free and Open to the public



he greatest Catholic missionary of nineteenth-century America," is how the late dean of American Catholic Historians, John Tracy Ellis, described Boniface Wimmer, the founder of Saint Vincent and Benedictine Monasticism in North America. Coming from the Bavarian Abbey of Metten, Wimmer came to America in 1846 to establish the Order of Saint Benedict in the New World, to evangelize the immigrants, and to preserve and strengthen their Catholic faith and identity by providing them with pastoral care and formal education.

Numbers never tell the full story, but it is interesting to note that by 1880, only 34 years after Wimmer and his eighteen companions arrived in Pennsylvania, nearly 900 Benedictine monks and nuns were working and praying in 60 monasteries in the United States. These monastics served 138 parishes where they provided pastoral care for 44,000 souls, operated three major seminaries, six colleges, and 63 elementary schools, and educated an estimated 7,000 students. 

By 1880, Benedictine monks and nuns served in 21 American dioceses and vicariates apostolic (out of a total of 70), located in 20 states and territories of the Union. Most of the Benedictine monks and nuns who carried out this work of pastoral care, evangelization, and education in nineteenth-century America regarded Boniface Wimmer as their founder and their inspiration.

Today, American Benedictines who trace their roots back to Wimmer serve in more than 20 American states, as well as in Canada, Mexico, Puerto Rico, the Bahamas, Colombia, Brazil, Taiwan, and Japan.

To honor the 125th Anniversary of Boniface Wimmer's death (December 2012), the Gallery inaugurated a permanent exhibit made up of personal artifacts from Wimmer's life to honor his legacy and enduring contributions to the Church and monasticism.

A complimentary booklet accompanies this display.

This Exhibit was Featured on the New Liturgical Movement. Click for Story.

 

Gallery Hours

Tuesdays through Sundays, 1 to 4 p.m.
Closed Mondays
Free and open to the public
  

The Saint Vincent Gallery at Saint Vincent College | 300 Fraser Purchase Road | Latrobe, PA 15650-2690
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